2015 Green Lands
Blue Waters Conference

Bridges and Buffers, Farms and Cities:
Continuous Living Cover Farming Systems

Green Lands Blue Waters welcomes our distinguished 2015 conference speakers:

 

Keynote Speakers

Joan Iverson Nassauer
Joan Iverson Nassauer

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Wes Jackson
Wes Jackson

 

Plenary Speakers

Emily Heaton
Emily Heaton

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John Baker
John Baker

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Don Wyse with Kernza
Don Wyse

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John Jaschke
John Jaschke

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Wayne Anderson
Wayne Anderson

 

 

Joan Iverson Nassauer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Joan Iverson Nassauer, Professor of Landscape Architecture, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, works in the field of ecological design. In transdisciplinary projects, she investigates how rural and metropolitan landscapes can embody healthy ecological processes and, simultaneously, be valued by their inhabitants. A Fellow by the American Society of Landscape Architects (1992) and a Fellow of the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (2007), she was named Distinguished Scholar by the International Association of Landscape Ecology (IALE) (2007) and Distinguished Practitioner of Landscape Ecology (1998). Her research has influenced green infrastructure design, ecological restoration, urban and rural watershed management, transportation planning, and the development of metropolitan neighborhoods and brownfields in many parts of the world. The author of more than 80 refereed papers and books, she addressed ecological design in Placing Nature (Island Press 1997), and offered alternative future scenarios for agriculture in From the Corn Belt to the Gulf (RFF Press 2007).

 

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Wes Jackson blank white space Wes Jackson, President of The Land Institute, was born in 1936 on a farm near Topeka, Kansas. After attending Kansas Wesleyan (B.A Biology, 1958), he studied botany (M.A. University of Kansas, 1960) and genetics (Ph.D. North Carolina State University, 1967). He was a professor of biology at Kansas Wesleyan and later established the Environmental Studies department at California State University, Sacramento, where he became a tenured full professor. He resigned that position in 1976 and returned to Kansas to found The Land Institute.
Dr. Jackson’s writings include both papers and books. His most recent works, Nature as Measure (2011) and Consulting the Genius of the Place: An Ecological Approach to a New
blank white space Agriculture (2010), were both published by Counterpoint Press. The Virtues of Ignorance: Complexity, Sustainability, and the Limits of Knowledge (2008) and Rooted in the Land: Essays on Community and Place (1996), were co-edited with William Vitek. Becoming Native to This Place, 1994, sketches his vision for the resettlement of America's rural communities. Altars of Unhewn Stone appeared in 1987 and Meeting the Expectations of the Land, edited with Wendell Berry and Bruce Colman, was published in 1984. New Roots for Agriculture, 1980, outlines the basis for the agricultural research at The Land Institute.

The work of The Land Institute has been featured extensively in the popular media including The Atlantic Monthly, Audubon, National Geographic, Time Magazine, Yes! Magazine, The MacNeil-Lehrer News Hour, and National Public Radio's "All Things Considered." Life magazine named Wes Jackson as one of 18 individuals they predict will be among the 100 "important Americans of the 20th century." In the November 2005 issue, Smithsonian named him one of “35 Who Made a Difference.” He was included in Rolling Stone’s “100 Agents of Change” in March, 2009 and in Ingram’s “50 Kansans You Should Know” in January 2011.

Wes Jackson is a recipient of the Pew Conservation Scholars award (1990), a MacArthur Fellowship (1992), Right Livelihood Award (Stockholm), known as “Alternative Nobel Prize” (2000), and the Louis Bromfield Award (2010). He has received five honorary doctorates. In 2007 he received the University of Kansas Distinguished Service Award and was one of the 2011 recipients of the University of Kansas College of Liberal Arts & Sciences’ Distinguished Alumni Awards. Garden Club of America awarded him the Elizabeth Craig Weaver Proctor Medal in 2012.

In addition to lecturing nationwide and abroad, Dr. Jackson is involved outside The Land Institute with a variety of projects including being a Post Carbon Institute Fellow.

 

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Emily Heaton blank white space Dr. Emily Heaton leads the Biomass Production and Physiology Laboratory at Iowa State University.
She is an Associate Professor of Agronomy at Iowa State University (http://faculty.agron.iastate.edu/heaton/). Her group aims to understand the growth and productivity of dedicated biomass crops, specifically perennial C4 grasses, and how they can be managed to provide multiple ecosystem
  blank white space services. They use combined field and modelling approaches to investigate the how the environment affects key plant processes (e.g., photosynthesis, biomass accumulation, water and nutrient use), as well as how plants affect the environment (e.g., soil quality, GHG emissions, water and nutrient cycling). Typical activities focus on the plant and field plot scale, with implications at the watershed and ecosystem scale. Through collaboration, we use our data to explain observed phenomena and predict future behavior, with an ultimate goal of providing useful information about the role biomass crops can and should play in the Midwestern USA. Emily remains involved with her family farm (www.cavenyfarm.com), which employs diverse agricultural methods ranging from heritage poultry grazing to biomass crop production for sustainable and profitable land management.

 

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John Baker blank white space John Baker, Research Leader for the USDA-ARS Soil & Water Management Unit in St. Paul, MN and an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Soil, Water & Climate at the University of Minnesota. A native of Ohio, John received his BS from the Ohio State University and MS and Ph.D. degrees from Texas A&M University, focusing on soil-plant water relations, before joining ARS and the University of Minnesota in 1987. His early research career was devoted to the development of methods
  blank white space for measuring the transport of water in soil and the exchange of water, CO2 and trace gases between the surface and the atmosphere in agricultural systems. Over the past decade he has used these methods to test management practices designed to reduce adverse impacts of agriculture on the environment and increase the resilience of agricultural systems in the face of a changing climate. He directs a group of five ARS scientists, is an active member of three graduate faculties at the University of Minnesota, and is co-PI of a US-DOE Ameriflux site at Rosemount MN, where he and colleagues have collected more than a dozen years of continuous carbon, energy and water balance data that are used to develop and test global climate models by scientists throughout the world.
Websites:
USDA-ARS
Biometeorology

 

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Don Wyse blank white space

Don Wyse, Professor- University of Minnesota (appointed 1974)
Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics

Ph.D.: Michigan State (1974)
Dr. Wyse is a Professor in the Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics, and Co-Director of the Center for Integrated Natural Resources and Agricultural Management at the University of Minnesota, where he teaches and does research in weed biology and ecology, biological weed management, agroecology, and perennial crop breeding.

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His overall research focus has been on the development of multifunctional cropping systems that produce ecosystem services, are highly productive, and economically viable. Specific research areas have included the design of cropping systems that provide continuous living cover and the evaluation of their impact on soil erosion, nutrient, and water management; impact of cropping systems on management of invasive species; use of cover crops to develop no-tillage organic grain and vegetable cropping systems; breeding of perennial grasses, perennial sunflower, and perennial flax; breeding and selection of hairy vetch and mustard species as cover crops.

 

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John Jaschke blank white space

John Jaschke, Executive Director of the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources (BWSR)
John was formerly the Dakota County (MN) Water Resources Manager and the Administrator of the Vermillion River Watershed. His prior positions were as Land and Water Section Administrator and Wetlands Program Manager at the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources (BWSR), and Area Hydrologist with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) in Duluth and New Ulm. He has B.S. degrees in Geology and Geophysics from the University of Minnesota and a M.A. in Public Administration from Minnesota State University - Mankato. He grew up on a dairy farm in central Minnesota (Morrison County) with 10 younger siblings and now lives in St. Paul.

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The Board of Water and Soil Resources (BWSR) is charged with implementing conservation and clean water policies, programs and projects via a statewide partnership that weds state, local and federal efforts to protect and restore the waters, wetlands, working lands, soils, prairies and related natural habitats of Minnesota. The mission of the BWSR board and staff is to improve and protect Minnesota’s water and soil resources by working in partnership with local organizations and private landowners.

Agency programs, primarily delivered through local units of government, have resulted in less sediment and nutrients entering our lakes, rivers, and streams; enhanced fish and wildlife and native plant habitats; protection of the state’s wetlands and conservation practices on our working lands and public drainage systems. These outcomes are achieved in spite of the pressures from intensification of agriculture, land development pressures, and expanding populations and related infrastructure expansions in many parts of the state.

Sound management of our water resources is key to a healthy and thriving Minnesota – and that view is shared by a large and growing number of local communities and citizens. Because 78% of the state is held in private ownership, BWSR’s focus on private lands is critical to the state attaining its goals for clean water and healthy landscapes. Managed wisely, our watersheds, our working lands and our groundwater resources will continue to be foundational components of the state’s current and future environmental and economic quality of life.

 

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Wayne Anderson blank white space

Wayne P. Anderson, P.E.; Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA)
A graduate of the University of Minnesota with a Bachelor of Agricultural Engineering degree, Wayne has worked for the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency( MPCA) for 42 years. He is a registered professional engineer in the state of Minnesota, and a member of numerous professional organizations. He started at the MPCA in its formative years, just as federal policy such as the Clean Water Act Amendments were being rolled out.

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Initially Wayne worked in the feedlot program overseeing both regulatory and assistance functions. Wayne has also supervised the development of the state nonpoint source control program and watershed management assistance. During the administration of Minnesota Governor Carlson, Wayne coordinated efforts to assess and lead a Governor’s initiative to “Clean up the Minnesota River”. Wayne served several MPCA Commissioners in the role of MPCA Agricultural Liaison focusing on communications and policy coordination with the Agricultural Community and its stakeholders. Wayne has been the state’s coordinating committee member for the National Mississippi River/ Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force since its inception in 1997, and has led the formation of the Minnesota Nutrient Reduction Strategy for Minnesota. In his current position as Principal Engineer for Watershed Assistance, Wayne is focusing on implementing effective solutions through the state’s clean water programs.

 

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